Upscaling the Neolithic house.Trends in house size and function in Anatolia and the Balkans

  • Maxime Brami Palaeogenetics Group, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Keywords: Neolithic, house size, public buildings, practices, Anatolia, Balkans

Abstract

This study dwells upon a dataset of 325 rectangular and sub-rectangular buildings from ten sites in Central and Western Anatolia to offer a discussion of house size in the Neolithic and contextualize unusually large buildings in Anatolia and the Balkans. The article highlights: (1) a marked increase in residential floorspace from the 8th to the 6th millennium cal. BC; and (2) a tendency to scale up the house, without actually increasing the number of rooms. Further west than Cappadocia, not a single Neolithic building differed markedly in shape or elaboration from contemporary residential structures, and it is safe to assume that all were for domestic use only. A few outlier rooms from Nea Nikomedeia, Kovačevo and Sofia-Slatina (‘big house’) reached, however, dimensions of circa or slightly over 100 m². The paper addresses the function of these extra-large rooms: how did they fit into the residential landscape? Were they still used as domestic spaces? Parallels are drawn with an unusually large building at Çukuriçi Höyük, near Ephesus, to characterize a new category of Neolithic structures, referred to as ‘houses plus (+)’.

Published
2021-12-21
How to Cite
Brami, M. (2021). Upscaling the Neolithic house.Trends in house size and function in Anatolia and the Balkans. Studia Praehistorica, 15, 37-50. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.53250/stprae15.37-50
Section
Articles